Neolithic Site of Çatalhöyük (History, Visiting, Maps, Transportation)

A view of the Neolithic Site of Çatalhöyük

The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is a magical place with its historical value in terms of hosting some of the firsts, and it’s amazing remains. It is known that Çatalhöyük is one of the oldest settlement areas in the Neolithic period and is around 9 thousand years old. Çatalhöyük goes way beyond just being a Neolithic site with its culturally rich history and various artworks.

The excavations in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük continue even today since it was a place for humans to live for such a long time, and the findings do not seem to come to an end. The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is one of the best places to observe and get information about how life was back then in the Neolithic period.

The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is one of the 18 heritages in Turkey that are on the list of UNESCO’s World Heritage. It was accepted as a world heritage in 2012.

Contents

Visiting the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük

If you are into art, history, archeology, architecture, or if you are just a curious person, visiting Çatalhöyük will not disappoint you. You can see the places that people who are 9000 years older than you lived, and what they were up to at that time.

Where is the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük located on the map of Turkey?

The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is located in the Çumra district of Konya province in the Central Anatolia region of Turkey. To be more specific, it is 10 kilometers east of Çumra district.

How do you get to the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük?

Getting to Çatalhöyük from Konya City Center

The distance between the city center of Konya and the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is 44 kilometers, which will take approximately 50 minutes of driving. In the summertime, you can find minibusses that go to the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük from the city center.

The most convenient way to get to the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük from Konya city center is by car. If you do not have a car with you, you can take a taxi, which will take around 135 Turkish liras. The second most convenient way to get to the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is by train.

To get to Konya train station, you can use one of the following buses:

  • 105-A
  • 55-A
  • 56-A
  • 64-A
  • 68-A
  • 86-A
  • 96-A

Once you get to the Konya train station, you should take the train that goes to Çumra direction. The train that goes to Çumra direction is named “Konya-Karaman”. As you stop in Çumra station you should take a taxi from here to get to the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük. Taxi from Çumra to the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük would cost around 40 Turkish liras.

Getting to Konya from Istanbul

You can get to Konya from Istanbul by car, train, plane, or bus. Driving to Konya from Istanbul will take approximately 8 hours, and the bus option is approximately the same. If you want to get to Konya by train, you can use the high-speed train. From Pendik train station of Istanbul, you can get to Konya train station within 4,5 hours. In addition, you can find flights from Istanbul to Konya every day.

Getting to Konya from Ankara

The road trip would be so much shorter since Ankara is only 3 hours of driving away from Konya. Like İstanbul, you can use intercity buses to get to Konya from Ankara. From Ankara train station, you can take a high-speed train to Konya, which will take 1 hour and 50 minutes.

Getting to Konya from Antalya

The distance between Antalya and Konya is approximately 303 kilometers, which is the equivalent of 4 hours of driving. You can also use intercity buses. There are no train options to get to Konya from Antalya.

Getting to Konya from Cappadocia

Ürgüp is 243 kilometers away from Konya, which is the equivalent of 3 hours of driving. You can use intercity buses as well, but unfortunately, there are no direct flights to Konya from Ürgüp. If you want to use the airway you need to indirectly get to Konya, which would be way more difficult than getting there by bus or car.

Visiting hours of the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük

In the summertime (defined as the dates between April 1 and October 1), the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is open to visitors between 10:00 AM and 07:00 PM.

In the wintertime (defined as the dates between October 1 and April 1), the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is open to visitors between 09:00 AM and 05:00 PM.

The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is closed on weekends. 

Entrance fee of the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük

Visiting the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is free of charge.

How long to spend in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük?

If you just want to see around, 1 hour in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük will be enough. But if you are curious about the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük and spend time for a quick photoshoot, this duration might increase.

History of the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük

It is estimated that the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük was first established 9000 years ago. This small city, which was established next to a dried-up river, was used as a settlement area for a group of Neolithic people. Since most of the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is not discovered yet, there is little information about the history.

Formerly, settlement areas were not used permanently. The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is the first area that people gave up on wandering and switched to settled social life. The earliest settlement in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük goes back to 7500 AD. 

View of Çatalhöyük

The houses are very nearly grouped collectively, and neighbors are eager to trade with one another, marry each other, support each other, and eat together, just like we do in societies today. It can be observed that as the city grew, farming abilities and technology also developed. Thus, productivity increased with the storage techniques.

Discovery of Çatalhöyük

The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük was discovered by a group of British individuals, including James Mellaart, David French, and Allan Hall. The area where the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük was found impressed James Mellaart so much that he decided to excavate the area in 1961. 

James Mellaart was curious about the area of the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük was found because he was working in the excavations of Erisa, which was thought to be the oldest settlement area in the world. Participating in the excavation of Erisa made him quite curious about the ancient cities and settlement areas. The mounds first got his attention a couple of years before the first excavations, and James Mellaart was convinced that there was a huge secret buried under those mounds, and he was right.

The excavations in Çatalhöyük

The first excavation in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in 1961 lasted for 39 days, and 40 houses were found. The houses were not the only structures that were found in the first excavation conducted in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük. Different figures, bowls, and murals were found.

Catalhoyuk, Oldest town in the world, Konya

The excavation started by James Mellaart and his colleagues continued until 1965, and until 1965, they came to the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük every summer to continue their excavations. James Mellaart did not conduct any excavations after 1965 until 1993. In this 28 years of gap, James Mellaart was working as an academician in London. One of his students was inspired by James Mellaart and decided to get permission for continuing the excavations in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük.

In 1993, James Mellaart’s student Ian Hodder got permission for starting an excavation in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük. He started to work in excavations every summer, with teams consisting of local and foreign professionals.

Even though the excavations in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük was started earlier, the comprehensive and detailed excavations did not start until 1998. Those comprehensive excavations were conducted by Jonathan Last and Cabrina Gibson. In 2006, with the administration of Peter Biehl and Burçin Erdoğu, those detailed excavations continued. The team working for Peter Biehl and Burçin Erdoğu was working especially on the area that is now called “West Çatalhöyük”.

The excavation area started to force people in terms of breathing, and people decided to build a pillbox. In 2002, a pillbox named “South pillbox” was built. In 2007, a pillbox named “North pillbox” was built.

The excavation that Ian Hodder got expired in 2018, and after that, the Turkish government continued the excavations in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük.

Why is the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is Important?

Çatalhöyük is an important area because it has witnessed the transition to settled social life in history. The transition to settled social life was not the only thing that the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük witnessed. It has witnessed some other socially and historically important events like the emergence of agriculture and hunting.

Hunting scenes from neolithic paintings of Catalhoyuk, 6500 BCE, Museum of Anatolian Civilization, Ankara, Turkey
A hunting scene that is found on the walls of Çatalhöyük,
Museum of Anatolian Civilizations in Ankara

The East mound of Çatalhöyük consists of 18 Neolithic settlement area layers and lots of remains that illustrate the transition to settled social life and social organization. The remaining that illustrates those big transitions include murals, reliefs, sculptures, in addition to other findings. In the West mound of the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük, remains that have the features of the Chalcolithic period culture were found. When the findings from both the Chalcolithic period and the Neolithic period were compared and contrasted, researchers concluded that this area was significant in history.

The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük especially has significance in history because this area is evidence of how village residents living in the area over 2000 years transitioned into settled social life. Even though similar Neolithic sites were found in the Middle East and Anatolia, the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük has a special place among them because any other Neolithic sites could illustrate the culture, transitions, and much more valuable information in the Neolithic periods as the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük.

Besides the transition to settled social life, the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is one of the first settlement areas in the whole world history. Additionally, one of the first examples of fabric was found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük. This piece of fabric is one of the most well-preserved findings. Also, the first home and sacred place architecture was found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük.

Why Çatalhöyük named “Çatalhöyük”?

The word Çatalhöyük is a compound name in Turkish and consists of the words “fork” (çatal) and “mound” (höyük). This Neolithic site was named Çatalhöyük because it consists of two mounds that are located in a way that would remind you of a fork. To be more specific, the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is a big mound that consists of two other mounts in different heights. And the shape of the mound gave it its name.

Life in Çatalhöyük

The remains in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük enabled researchers to find so many things about life at that time, in Çatalhöyük. The researchers found information relevant to religion, culture, architecture, economy, and daily life in Çatalhöyük.

Religion in Çatalhöyük

Religion and belief, in general, were valued in Çatalhöyük. On the West mound side of the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük, the oldest holy structures could be observed. The rooms that have sacred meanings, has a bigger area in comparison to other rooms in general. Besides, the murals, sculptures, and reliefs are sorts different from other murals, sculptures, and reliefs. In addition to being different, murals, sculptures, and reliefs are deeply carved, which is not seen in other murals, sculptures, and reliefs in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük.

Those different kinds of structures are over 40 in terms of number. The walls of those sacred structures were filled with beliefs illustrating the gods of hunting and abundance. In addition to beliefs in gods and goddesses, in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük, natural events such as natural disasters and weather conditions were considered as something extraordinary, and people give place to those events in the carvings.

For example, there is a carving in one of the holy structures that are resembling the eruption of a volcanic mountain. Since there is a volcanic mountain quite close to the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük, it can be inferred that people saw the eruption of the volcanic mountain and, impressed by it, subsequently decided to give a place in their holy areas. As another instance of value in nature in a holy way, carvings of some wild animals like lions, bulls, leopards were found carved into walls. Those animals were not just carved by themselves, but as in a goddess figure giving birth to them. This tells a lot in terms of religious and holy beliefs in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük.

Another important finding in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is the figurines of Kybele, who is a mother goddess figure that is famous in Anatolia. Those figurines of the mother goddess were typically made from baked clay. Those figurines of the mother goddess and others remaining related to mother goddess could be seen in all the layers between III and X. In addition to figurines of the mother goddess, findings such as bullhead and bull horn reliefs, in addition to reliefs of female breasts.

Neolithic stone sculpture representing Mother Goddess Kybele, or Goddess of Fertility, coming from the site of Catalhoyuk or Catal Huyuk in the Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey
Neolithic stone sculpture representing Mother Goddess Kybele found in Çatalhöyük
Museum of Anatolian Civilizations in Ankara

The mother goddess was described in three ways including the “young woman”, “old woman”, and “the woman giving birth”. The mother goddess is also known for representing abundance and wealth. The mother goddess is typically described as a loving and caring mother, but in some figurines, it is described as angry, which could possibly punish you for your mistakes. Those contradicting expressions in mother goddess figurines perfectly explain the meaning assigned to the mother goddess: She can give abundance to you, but she can also take that away.

Dead burial in Çatalhöyük

Dead burial is one of the most important things in a religious belief, and the style for dead burial tells a lot of us about the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük. The people in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük was burying the dead individuals under the rooms and terraces in their homes.

Graves under the houses in Çatalhöyük
Graves under the houses in Çatalhöyük

Some skeletons that were colored red were found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük, and they were placed in embryo position. Those colored and put in an embryo position skeleton were half-buried, and half of them would remain above the soil. The part that remains above the soil would cover with a piece of cloth.

It is observed that people in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük would bury more than one individual under the same room of the house. The gifts placed in graves would tell us that people in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük. Burying the dead people with a gift illustrates that people in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük had a belief in life after death.

Culture in Çatalhöyük

The walls of the houses in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük are filled with different artwork. Those artworks include rug patterns with geometrical shapes, scenes from hunting events, starts, different kinds of wild animals. It has been observed that those artworks are more common and frequent in the rooms that they bury dead people. This might be due to the artwork being relevant to the dead people.

The model rooms of Catalhoyuk. It is oldest town in world with large Neolithic and Chalcolithic best preserved city settlement in Cumra, Konya. It was built in about 7500 BC
A model house with artworks on the walls in Çatalhöyük

Even though the population of the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük was quite crowded, the findings illustrate that equality was very much significant there. The evidence shows that in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük, there is no governmental authority is present and this evidence further supports the significance of equality in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük.

This equality was not all about the authority and locals, but it was also about females and males. Thanks to modern scientific techniques, researchers found out that women and men in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük were eating pretty much the same foods. Researchers further explain that women and men were working in similar jobs, for instance, there was no concept of works that only men can do or vice versa. Women and men were contributing to the economy equally. Evidence also shows that in the social hierarchy, men and women were not treated differently.

In the culture of the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük, the beauty standard for women was being chubby. As it can be observed from the figurines of women, fat on the body was considered as a sign of health, fertility, and respect. Goddess figurines with fat bodies are evidence for this viewpoint.

Another evidence of the equality among people in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is that no remains in terms of monuments and big government buildings were found. Everybody was treated equally, everybody was buried in the same way, and no one got a fancy building for themselves for being in a higher step on hierarchy.

The architecture of Çatalhöyük

Perhaps one of the most interesting features of the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is its architecture since the homes in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük were built in a way that people are not used to seeing. Even if we consider the time back then, the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük would remain unique but it was found that the architecture was also different from the architecture of other places as well.

The houses

Reconstruction of Catal Huyuk or Catalhoyuk sanctuary, Including Bull heads from7th millennium b.C., Anadolu Medeniyetler Muzesi, museum of Anatolian civilization of Ankara, Turkey
A model that illustrates the houses in Çatalhöyük,
Museum of Anatolian Civilizations in Ankara

The houses in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük are characterized by being built one under another. All of the houses were built in the same plan. It was built in a way that the foundation Of one house was made from the walls of the other house. The estimated life for the buildings was 80 years, meaning that the houses could be sturdy for up to 80 years, and after 80 years pass, people in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük would clean the house to fill it up with soil and rubble, to build another one on the top of it.

The houses were planned in rectangular shapes, by using adobe bricks. Houses do not have stone foundations. The main rooms had adjacent rooms that were used as a warehouse and other rooms. The shapes of transitions between rooms are rectangular, oval, or square.

The roofs were made with soil that was named “white soil”. The white soil was used to plaster the reed drips to the roof. Roofs are able to stand thanks to wooden beams and the wooden beams’ support is studded inside the walls, which are also made from wood.

Long distances

An interesting feature of the houses in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is their location. In a city in which people make a living from agriculture is expected to be established near to the farming areas, but this was not the case in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük.

Researchers think that this was due to the demand for clay and plaster in the city. In other words, if people were settled somewhere close to the farming areas, they would have to travel long distances to get clay and plaster. The baskets at that time were not suitable for carrying clay and plaster, so people had to settle in an area where they can easily get clay and plaster. It was a lot easier to carry the harvest from the farming areas to their homes.

Besides, people were quite into trading, and the countries they trade with were not that close to the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük. This further illustrates that people in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük had no problem with traveling long distances.

The benefit of the rough terrain

Since the area that the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük was built was not plain and houses were at different heights, this difference was used as a way to optimize lighting and ventilation. The windows in each house were designed in a way that would maximize the daylight that comes in from the window and makes good ventilation possible. All components of the residences including soles and walls were plastered with white plaster by multiple layers. A plaster which is approximately 3 centimeters in thickness was used 160 times to layer it.

What was used in the structures of the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük?

To make the components of the houses even more sturdy, plants, weed, pieces of leaves were put into the plaster used. The entrance of the houses was not typically from doors, instead, there were stairs to get to the house from the roof. There was no entrance from the sidewalls, the roof was the only option to get in. Researchers have observed that the use of lime was intense in the early periods, but it gradually decreased, and clay was used instead. This change is thought to be due to the costly use of lime, requiring a lot of wood.

Artifacts of the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük

The model rooms of Catalhoyuk. It is oldest town in world with large Neolithic and Chalcolithic best preserved city settlement in Cumra, Konya. It was built in about 7500 BC
A model house in Çatalhöyük

A considerable number of artifacts found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük consisted of houses, but of course, this was not all. Artifacts found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük include pottery and some other small artifacts. The artifacts found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük were mainly made from terracotta, stone, trees, and obsidian.

Pottery

As I mentioned earlier, the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük was divided into two areas named as the East mound and the West mound. While the east mound was referring to the area that was used in the Neolithic era, the west mound was referring to the area that was used in the Chalcolithic era. The pottery artifacts found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük differ in two different mounds.

Pottery artifacts found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük can be listed as follows:

  1. Containers for food and drinks
  2. Containers for baking and cooking
  3. Containers for carrying
  4. Containers for storing

Even though pottery was known earlier in the east mound, any sign of using pottery in the east mound could not be found until the fifth layer. It can be observed that after the fifth layer, pottery was started to be widely used. The reason for pottery not being used until the fifth layer is the significant dexterity of people in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük to use wood and baskets.

The pottery that belongs to the XII. layer is characterized by having a primitive look, black, thick, and being poorly baked. It is known in pottery from XII. layer was including some plants such as leaves and weeds. In terms of shapes, bowls were quite deep, and pots were narrow.

In the west mound, pottery was kind of different.  West mound’s pottery is characterized by having a reddish paste and was including mica and grit.

Artifacts made from obsidian

Obsidian was widely used in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük, and this information could be derived from the artifacts found. Obsidian, which is a stone that could be found around volcanic mountains, was mainly used to make sharp objects such as arrows, knives, and spearheads. In addition, since obsidian is a shiny stone with reflective properties, people in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük used it to make mirrors.

Other artifacts

Besides pottery and materials made from obsidian in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük, other kinds of artifacts were found. Those artifacts played a big role in terms of understanding the culture, economy, and overall lifestyle in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük. Other artifacts found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük could be listed as follows:

  1. Mace heads
  2. Hand mills
  3. Grinding stones
  4. Mortars
  5. Burnish stones
  6. Hand axes
  7. Deep ladles
  8. Spoons
  9. Jewelry (rings made from stones, earrings, necklaces)

Economy of Çatalhöyük

The findings in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük proves that in the first eras of Çatalhöyük, people were earning their lives with hunting and gathering. Yet findings also prove that people transitioned into agriculture, starting with the Neolithic Evolution. After the Neolithic evolution, it is seen that people started to plant vegetables like peas, and grain products such as wheat and barley. At this time, people did not abandon the hunting, they were hunting excessively in this era as well. But while they were hunting, they made it possible to domesticate cattle.

The economy was not just about hunting, gathering, or agriculture. There are some pieces of evidence found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük about trade. Researchers think that people were trading the excess amounts that they do not need, such as valuable stones and salt. Seashells used as jewelry that were from Meditternean shores prove that at least some sort of trade was being done in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük. Some economic activities using other sorts of things in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük could be listed as the following:

  1. Production of tool made from bones
  2. Pottery
  3. Woodworking
  4. Basketry

Daily life in Çatalhöyük

Foundings in excavation of Catayhoyuk rock painting
Foundings in excavation of Çatalhöyük

One of the main things in Çatalhöyük that helped researchers to predict daily life in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is by looking at the architecture of the houses built. Since houses were made so closely with each other, researchers thought that this was not a sign of worry towards an occupation, since there are not signs of occupation in the area.

There are two things that can be inferred from such closely built houses, and since one of them is already eliminated, the other one made more sense to the researchers, which is about the family bonds in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük. Families were living as generations, and the houses were built one upon another, and the architectural values of the houses were illustrating how strong the bonds within families were.

The terraces of the houses were thought to be used as a place for celebrations, and they were being used as the streets since there is no normal concept of streets in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük as we know today.

In the skeletons found in houses, some skeletons had a weird structure around their eye, having more holes than usual. These excess holes were thought to be a result of anemia due to insufficient nourishment in the area.

Facts about the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük

The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is a magical place with its history, artifacts, culture, and story. The following are some of the facts about the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük that you may find interesting.

  • The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is 5000 years older than the Giza pyramid in Egypt.
  • Even though there was no authority to rule the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük, the site survived 4000 years without war.
  • The murals found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük could possibly be the first advertisement in history.
  • The first city plan ever was found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük.
  • The murals describing the eruption of a volcanic mountain tells us that the volcanic mountain around there was active at some point, even though it is today unactive.
  • The reason for the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük having so many numbers of layers is that people were building another home after using the current home for 80 years.
  • Even though some temples were found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük, there were no findings of proving the evidence of clergymen.

Further information and travel tips

As I mentioned earlier, the transportation to the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük might be difficult. The most convenient way to get to the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is by car, and you can rent a car in the city center. If you do not have a driver’s license that is valid in Turkey, you might want to prefer a taxi. You can agree on a price with a taxi driver to take you to the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük and taking you back.

If you want to understand and investigate the Neolithic site of Çatakhöyük further, there are lots of books and articles you can find about it. Especially the articles written about the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük would enlighten you very much.

Frequently asked questions about Çatalhöyük

If you are visiting the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük or if you just want to learn more about it, the following are some of the most frequently asked questions about it.

Is Çatalhöyük a civilization?

Çatalhöyük is not a civilization since it does not meet the requirements of being a civilization determined by archeologists.

What is something unusual in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük?

The most unusual thing about the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is that the site does not include any streets.

Who discovered the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük?

The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük was discovered by James Mellaart.

What does Neolithic mean?

Neolithic refers to the New Stone Age and is an important age in terms of transitions in society.

How old is the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük?

The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is over 9000 years old.

Where is the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük?

The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük is in a city called Konya in Turkey.

Are the excavations on the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük done? 

No, they are not. Actually, only around 5% of the area is discovered up to today and there are a lot more things to discover.

What was the largest number of plaster layers found in the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük?

The maximum layer of plaster consisted of more than 450 layers.

İsmail Çamönü

Hi! I am Ismail. I am a digital nomad from Turkey. I lived in many cities around Turkey during my life and I am passionate about traveling. At Nomad's Guide to Turkey, I share travel tips for nomads, expats, and tourists who would like to visit Turkey.

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